Roguard Wide Piper – Rat Bait Station

£9.95

Rats are a worldwide pest due to their capacity to cause structural damage, to spread life-threatening diseases, and to compete with man for food.
The popular Wide Piper rat bait stations are ideal for both the professional and the domestic user, protecting grain baits from the elements, contamination as well as keeping them dry and fresh.

Description

Roguard is a registered trademark of BASF.

The popular Wide Piper rat bait stations are ideal for both the professional and the domestic user, protecting grain baits from the elements, contamination as well as keeping them dry and fresh. The clear gravity feed tube provides instant visual measurement of bait taken.

Reducers in the dispenser discourage entrance of other creatures.

  1. Place Roguard Wide Pipers beside rat runs and also between burrows and feeding areas. Make sure they are not accessible for other animals or birds. Secure the bait station where necessary.
  2. Leave unbaited for at at least three days to allow rats to become used to their presence.
  3. Fill the translucent tube with your chosen rodenticide, checking and replenishing bait in accordance with the directions for use on the bait packaging.

Reducers in the dispenser which discourage entrance of other creatures.

Rats are a worldwide pest due to their capacity to cause structural damage, to spread life-threatening diseases, and to compete with man for food.

The species most commonly found in Europe is known as the Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus). A less commonly found species, the Black or Roof Rat, (Rattus rattus), is largely restricted to port areas.

Rats live alongside man, invading his buildings and eating his food. Rats transmit disease, which are potentially fatal to man such as Weil’s disease and murine typhus.

They also carry organisms which can damage man’s health such as Salmonella bacteria, viruses and parasites such as nematodes and worms.

Damage by rats to the fabric of buildings can be costly. Fires can easily be started after a rat has gnawed a cable. Gas and water pipes are also at risk and rat burrowing can undermine foundations and damage water courses.

Physically very strong, rats have been known to survive for two days in open water, to swim a mile in open sea and to get through a gap of less than 25mm.